Historic Markers

1906

Dorothy Q Chapter

A bronze tablet on the Federal Building in Crawfordsville commemorating Revolutionary War soldiers buried in Montgomery County.

1907, October 1

Mary Penrose Wayne Chapter

Marked Wayne Trace at the junction of Wayne Trace and New Haven Avenue, Fort Wayne, where General Anthony Wayne left for Fort Washington in Cincinnati.

1907

General de Lafayette Chapter

A granite monument along South River Road in Lafayette commemmorating Fort Ouiatenon, 1719, the first fort in Indiana, a French and Indian trading post.

1909, October 18

Francis Vigo Chapter

A marker in the Fairview Cemetery, Vincennes, commemmorating Francis Vigo whose devotion to the cause of American liberty aided the capture of Fort Sackville, February 25, 1779.

1909

Rushville Chapter

Rushville Public Library commemmorating a book solicitation and public subscription for the founding of the public library.

1910

John Paul Chapter

Michigan Hill, Madison, marking the Old Trail Michigan Road.

1911, October 5

General James Cox Chapter

Cenotaph in Old Cemetery, Kokomo.  Four sides marking burial site of Kokomo, War Chief of the Miami Indians, commemmorating the memory of early pioneers of the area and deceased Union soldiers. 

1912

Fort Harrison Chapter

A marker in Terre Haute to designate the site of Fort Harrison.

1913

Frances Slocum Chapter

A grave in the state park, Miami County, commemmorating the memory of Frances Slocum, a white child, adopted by the Miami Indians.

1914

General John Gibson Chapter

Courthouse grounds in Princeton commemmorating Judge William Prince who was a judge of the district, then part of the Northwest Territory.

1915, June 14

Paul Revere Chapter

Burlington Pike, a few miles outside of Muncie, marking the old town of Munsey, inhabited by the Munsee clan of the Delaware.

1915, September 7

The Hoosier Elm Chapter

West High Street, Corydon, a stone and bronze tablet placed under the Constitution Elm, commemmorating the framing of the Constitution of Indiana, June 10-29, 1816.

1916, June 8 

Mary Penrose Wayne Chapter

At the site of "Harmar Ford," on the bank of the Maumee River at the junction of Edgwater and Dearborn Streets, Fort Wayne, marks the site of an encounter with Miami Indians under Chief Little Turtle in October 1790, during which 183 soldiers were killed and 31 wounded.

1916, September 28

John Paul Chapter

Michigan Road and West Street, Madison, marks the beginning of the Michigan Road in 1832.

1916

Caroline Scott Harrison Chapter

On the lawn of the Indiana State House, Indianapolis, bronze marker placed at stone drinking fountain commemmorating the Old Trail of 1805-1836.  Rededicated in 2016 as part of Indiana's Bicentennial.

1916

Lone Tree Chapter

Greensburg Park on Road 29 to commemmorate the Michigan Road.

1916

General Francis Marion Chapter

Granite boulder and bronze tablet commemmorating Martin Boots, first white man to enter land in Marion.

1916

William Henry Harrison Chapter

Against the east side of the public library, Valparaiso, marker commemmorating the Old Sack Trail Road.

1916

Caroline Scott Harrison Chapter

Along National Road, Plainfield, wooden tablet marking the elm tree where President Martin Van Buren's conveyance was mired down and overturned.  Wooden tablet replaced by bronze, October 17, 1941.

1917, June 14

Paul Revere Chapter 

E.B. Ball estate, Minnetrista Boulevard, Muncie, marks site of Wah-Pe-Kal-Me-Kunk, the White River town of the Munsee clan of Delaware Indians.

1917, November 16

Piankeshaw Chapter

State and Main Streets, New Albany, Scribner House, built in 1814 by Joel Scribner, one of the founders of New Albany.  Purchased for use as Piankeshaw's chapter house.

1917

Francis Vigo Chapter

"Grouseland," home of William Henry Harrison built in 1804 in Vincennes was purchased by the chapter.  In 1923-1925, Indiana DAR raised $10,000 for an endowment fund to aid the upkeep of the mansion.

1918, November 24

Manitou Chapter

On the east side of Exchange State Bank in Akron to mark the site where trails crossed used by the Black Hawk, Miami, and Potawatomi tribes, journeying from Miami Reserve and Fort Wayne to Winamac.

1920, September 12

Manitou Chapter

At the west entrance of the courthouse in Rochester to honor those from Fulton County who gave their lives in World War I.

1922

General Van Rensselaer Chapter

A tree in Milroy Park dedicated to pioneer mothers of Jasper County.

1922, April 5

New Harmony Chapter

A concrete corner post at South Main opposite Murphy Park in New Harmony marking the site of the labyrinth built by the Rappites (1814-1824).

1922, April 17

Mary Mott Green Chapter

A bronze tablet on the east side of the rotunda of the public library in memory of Revoutionary War soldiers buried in Shelby County cemeteries.

1922, June 14

Manitou Chapter

A boulder and plaque placed along U.S. Route 31 at the southeast corner of the Tippecanoe River bridge north of Rochester at the site of the Chippe-Wa-Nung village of 1836 to commemmorate the peace treaty, between General William Henry Harrison and the Potawatomis, transferring Indian lands west.  The site was also the encampment of the soldiers and Indians.

1922, June 23

Ann Rogers Clark Chapter

A monument erected in Clarksville at George Rogers Clark's old home, in his memory.

1922, August 6

Olde Towne Chapter

Seven miles east of Logansport on the bank of the Eel River to mark the charge made in the Battle of Olde Towne, August 1791.

1922

Washburn Chapter

A row of hard maple trees planted along the road to the cemetery in honor of Putnam County soldiers who served in World War I.

1922

Rushville Chapter

At Rush County Courthouse naming 22 Revolutionary War soldiers buried in Rush County.

1922, November 11

Lone Tree Chapter

A tablet on a boulder at the east entrance to the courthouse park commemmorating Colonel Thomas Hendricks, a veteran of the War of 1812, who founded Greensburg in 1821.

1922, November 19

Dorothy Q Chapter

Offield Creek in Montgomery County at the site of the cabin of William Offield, recognized as the first settler in the county.

1923

Rushville Chapter

At the cabin in Rushville Memorial Park, built in 1808, to honor Indiana's only general killed during the Civil War, William A. Hackleman.  He was born in this cabin.

1923, May 30

Green Tree Tavern Chapter

Marked the gravesite of Indiana's first governor, Jonathan Jennings, in Charlestown Cemetery.

1923, June 14

Mary Penrose Wayne Chapter

At the junction of St. Joe Boulevard and Delaware Avenue in Fort Wayne at the site of the last French fort erected on the Fort Wayne River in 1763.  The fort was erected by Captain de Raimond and was the scene of the massacre of Ensign Holmes and his entire garrison.

1923, June 16

Potawatomi Chapter

A bronze tablet on a boulder at the Bailey Branch Library at 15th and Madison in Gary to mark the site of Gibson Inn, built in 1837, located on the Detroit-Fort Dearborn Trail.

1923

Samuel Huntington Chapter

A memorial tablet erected in memory of soldiers from Huntington County killed in World War I.  The marker is located on the lawn of the Huntington County Courthouse near the west entrance.

1923

Charles Carroll Chapter

A wooden marker six miles north of Delphi inscribed, "Carrollton Elms" commemmorating the old elms along the trail through Carroll County used when the Potawatomi Indians were deported.

1923

Samuel Huntington Chapter

A marker commemmorating the treaty signed between the Indians and whites.

1923, October 2

Schuyler Colfax Chapter

A granite boulder and bronze marker placed northwest of South Bend where the highway passes between Riverview and Highland Cemeteries to commemorate LaSalle and his party, the first white men to visit this region in December of 1679.

1923, October 12

Fort Harrison Chapter

A bronze marker placed at 4th and Mulberry Streets in Terre Haute to mark the section set aside by the incorporators when the town was established in 1816.  The first school was called Hook School.

1924, April 18

Mississinewa Chapter

A boulder on the Jay County Courthouse lawn in Portland in memory of Civil War General John Peter Cleaver Shanks (1826-1901), congressman and lawyer who called Portland his home for 62 years.

1924, August 24

Colonel Archibald Lochry Chapter

At Riverview Cemetery in Aurora near the spot along Lochry Creek where Indians ambushed Colonel Archibald Lochry and his men on August 24, 1781.

1924, October 26

General James Cox Chapter

A large flagpole and bronze marker were placed in Foster Park, Kokomo, marking the vicinity of the first church and schoolhouse in the city and to commemmorate the valor of all soldiers from the community.

1924

Richmond Chapter

A granite monument inscribed, "Marks the boundary line between government and Indian lands.  Fixed by General Anthony Wayne and twelve tribes of Indians in the Greenville Treaty, 1795 and site of Salisbury, one-third mile south west, first county seat of Wayne County and birthplace of Oliver P. Morton, war governor of Indiana."  Located about two and one-half miles west of Richmond where Salisbury Road crosses the National Road.

1924

Caroline Scott Harrison Chapter

Assisting Indianapolis historical societies, marked the site of the McCormick Cabin on the northeast corner of West Washington Street and White River.  The cabin was the first built in the city.

1924

John Conner Chapter

At Dale Cemetery in Connersville to commemmorate Revolutionary War soldiers in Fayette County.

1925

Kik-tha-we-nund Chapter

A boulder tablet marking the cabin site of Kik-tha-we-nund, Indian Chief Anderson, founder of Andersontown.

1925

Colonel Archibald Lochry Chapter

At the east end of the Westside Bridge at Lawrenceburg to mark the site of the cabin of the first settler Adam Flake.

1925, July 4

Twin Forks Chapter

Bronze marker on the site of an old Indian trading post.  The site is now occupied by the Philip Harman Show Store on Main Street in Brookville.

1925, July 28

Mississinewa Chapter

A boulder northeast of Portland to mark the site of Liber College which opened on November 5, 1853.

1925

General Francis Marion Chapter

A boulder in Marion on the site of the first white man's cabin in Grant County.  Cabin was erected by Martin Boots in 1825.

1925

New Harmony Chapter

In New Harmony marking the site of the 1851 toll gate on the Plank Road from New Harmony to Mt. Vernon.

1925

Caroline Scott Harrison Chapter

A large boulder at the farm of Mrs. William Watson Woolen to mark the Indian trail from that point to, "Lower Delaware Town," in Marion County.

1925, November 11

Major Hugh Dinwiddie Chapter

On the library lawn in Knightstown to honor Revolutionary War soldiers buried in Henry County.

After 1925

Mary Mott Green Chapter

A marker on State Road 44 beside the railroad tracks on South Harrison Street in Shelbyville to mark the first railroad west of the Allegheny Mountains which was built by Judge W.J. Peasley on July 4, 1834.  The marker has since been removed to the local historical museum.

1926, May 23

Rushville Chapter

Located along County Road 200S and three-fourths of a mile east of County Road 450E to mark the site of the first meeting house in Rush County which was built near this farm on the Little Flat Rock River in 1825.

1926

Daniel Brooks Chapter

A tablet inscribed, "Upon this slope lies buried the Pioneers of Hindostan, who died during the years 1818-1835."

1926, July 1

John Paul Chapter

At the top of Michigan Hill in Madison, where the old road intercepts the present Michigan Road, to mark the Old Michigan Road built in 1832.

1926, September 16

Paul Revere Chapter

A memorial tablet on a century old stone, which had been used as a door stop on the Gilbert House, was placed at the American Legion Headquarters in Muncie in honor of Mary Jane Gilbert, the first white child born in Delaware County.

1926, October 1

Major Hugh Dinwiddie Chapter

A bronze tablet on a boulder at the corner of Maine and Washington Streets in Knightstown to commemmorate the site of the first house in Knightstown which was built in 1827 by Waitsell M. Carey.

1926, November 10

Mississinewa Chapter

At the Jay County Courthouse in Portland to honor all Revolutionary Way soldiers who made their homes in Jay County.

1927

Richard Henry Lee Chapter

A fountain on the courthouse square in Covington to honor all pioneer settlers.

1927, May 21

White River Chapter

A boulder and tablet at the top of S.E. Second Hill in Washington inscribed, "In memory of all soldiers of the Revolution buried in Daviess County."

1927, June 14

John Connor Chapter

A granite boulder and bronze plaque at Fifth and Eastern Streets in Connersville commemmorating John Connor who was the first settler of Connersville.

1927, July 31

Rushville Chapter

At the junction of State Road 3 and U.S. Highway 52 south of Rushville to mark the site of the first court of Rush County organized April 4, 1822, on the farm of Steven Sims.

1927, September 28

Julia Watkins Brass Chapter

At Columbia Avenue and Ridge Road in Munster to mark the site of the tavern owned by Allen and Julia Watkins Brass.

1927, October 4

LaGrange de LaFayette Chapter

A bronze tablet dedicated to the memory of Revolutionary War soldiers buried in LaGrange County.

1928, May 27

Richmond Chapter

A stone with a metal plaque at North 10th Street Park in Richmond to honor Andrew and Elizabeth Waymire Hoover, Revolutionary War patriots, who settled in Wayne County in 1816 and who laid out and named the town of Richmond.  The stone was erected by Hoover descendants and dedicated by the Richmond Chapter.

1928

Paul Revere Chapter

A monument in Fredericksburg, Virginia, at the home of George Rogers Clark.

1928, June 2

Twin Forks Chapter

A bronze Real Daughter marker in the Big Cedar Cemetery in Brookville to mark the grave of Ann Stout Waldorf.

1928, August 24

Colonel Archibald Lochry Chapter

At the gate of the Glendale Cemetery in Lawrenceburg to honor Brigadier General Zebulon Montgomery Pike, discoverer of Pike's Peak, and his father, Zebulon, who was a Revolutionary War soldier and owner of the original cemetery site where he is buried.

1928, October 11

Mississinewa Chapter

A boulder eight miles south of Portland to mark the site of an Indian boundary line established by treaty with the Miami Indians at St. Mary's, Ohio, October 8, 1818.

1928, October 27

Ann Rogers Clark and Piankeshaw Chapters

A granite marker along Highway 31 commemmorating the visit of Marquis de LaFayette to Jeffersonville in 1825.

1928, October 28

Richmond Chapter

Sponsored a monument, "Madonna of the Trail," at the entrance to Glen Miller Park in Richmond as one of the twelve monuments erected by NSDAR on the Ocean to Ocean Memorial Highway and the National Old Trails Road as a tribute to the memory of "The Pioneer Mother of the Covered Wagon Days."

1928, November 11

Winchester Chapter

A life size bronze Doughboy on the courthouse lawn honoring 36 soldiers of Randolph County killed in World War I.

1928

John Paul Chapter

At John Parl Park facing 3rd Street in Madison in memory of the veterans of all wars of the United States.

1928

Caroline Scott Harrison Chapter

Assisting with a bronze marker in Jeffersonsville commemmorating the site where Lafayette landed in 1825 on his visit to Jeffersonville.

1928

Kentland Chapter

A tree planted and marker placed on the courthouse lawn in Kentland in honor of three surviving Civil War Soldiers, John Higgins, Charles Ross, and Samuel Means.

1928

Manitou Chapter

A tablet at the main entrace to the courthouse in Rochester to mark the site of the Erie Canal in 1852.

1928

General John Gibson Chapter

Along State Highway 64 near Francisco to mark the site of the Erie Canal in 1852.

1928, September 22

Mary Penrose Wayne Chapter

A marker on the Swinney homestead in honor of nine Revolutionary War soldiers buried in Allen County; moved to the Veteran's Memorial on O'Day Road in 2000.

1929, April 20

General Francis Marion Chapter

A bronze tablet at the Martin Boots School in Marion to commemmorate the first settlers, Martin Boots, David Conner, and David and Nathan Branson.

1929

Estabrook Chapter

A bronze tablet on the courthouse honoring Revoutionary War soldiers buried in Parke County.

1929, May

Schuyler Colfax Chapter

Assisting with a boulder and marker at 601 West Colfax Avenue, South Bend, to mark the site of the residence of Schuyler Colfax, Vice President of the United States (1869-1873).  This was a dedication of the marker placed October 4, 1916.

1929, June 9

Wa-pe-ke-way Chapter

A marble tablet along Road 267 south of Plainfield marking the site of the first settlement in Hendricks County in 1820 on Jefferson Miles' farm (Miles Orchard).  A replacement was rededicated in 1956.

1929, June 14

Abijah Bigelow Chapter

On the building at the corner of 4th and Pine Streets in Michigan City to mark the site of the first schoolhouse.

1929

General Francis Marion Chapter

A flagpole placed in Memorial Coliseum Park with a bronze tablet 

1929, October

Colonel Archibald Lochry Chapter

At the Dearborn County Courthouse in Lawrenceburg to honor Revolutionary War soldiers buried in Dearborn County.

1929, October11

Colonel Archibald Lochry Chapter

Along United States Route 50 at the Indiana-Ohio state line to mark the location of the first principal meridian in 1798.

1929, November 9

General de Lafayette Chapter

A granite monument at "Prophet's Rock" along North River Road in Lafayette to mark the site where The Prophet sat and sang to encourage the Indians in the Battle of Tippecanoe on November 7, 1811.

1930

Samuel Huntington Chapter

Elm tree planted and marked in Memorial Park in Huntington honoring the George Washington Bicentennial.  The park is located at 1200 W. Park Drive in Huntington.

1930, June 1

General John Gibson Chapter

A marker west of a bridge over the canal dedicated to the use of the Wabash and Erie Canal.

1930, June

Francis Vigo Chapter

A merker in Old Cemetery in Vincennes honoring five unknown Revolutionary War soldiers who assisted George Rogers Clark in the capture of Fort Sackville.

1930, June 15

Nathan Hinkle Chapter

At the courthouse in Sullivan to commemorate 25 Revolutionary War soldiers buried in Sullivan County.

1930, September

Captain Harmon Aughe Chapter

A memorial to the Revolutionary War soldiers buried in Clinton County.

1930, October

Colonel Archibald Lochry Chapter

Stones located at George and Morrison Streets and at Hogan Creek Bridge in Aurora honoring the first white child born in the Northwest Territory outside of Vincennes, Samuel Morrison, son of Ephraim Morrison who was a Revolutionary War soldier.

1930, November 5

Colonel Augustin de la Balme Chapter

Five miles east of Columbia City to mark the spot where Colonel de la Balme, while he was helping American soldiers clear a way for commerce, was massacred by Miami Indians under Chief Little Turtle.  Base replaced and stone reset in September 2010 by the chapter.

1931, June 14

General Francis Marion Chapter

Marker at the Marion Memorial Fountain in memory of an early pioneer, David Branson, who donated land for a courthouse in May 1831.

1931, November 11

Julia Watkins Brass Chapter

On the front of the American Legion building in Crown Point to mark the homestead site of the first permanent pioneer family and founders of Crown Point, Solon and Maria Evans Robinson.

1932

General de Lafayette Chapter

A marker on the Main Street Bridge denoting the old Wabash and Erie Canals and the first buildings in Lafayette.

1932, May

Mississinewa Chapter

A boulder at 235 West Walnut Street in Portland in honor of the Bicentennial of George Washington and marking the site of the first school building erected in Portland in 1850.

1932, July 4

William Tuffs Chapter

A native boulder with a bronze tablet honoring three Revolutionary War soldiers buried in Elkhart County.

1932

General de Lafayette Chapter

A Washington Elm on the community house lawn in Lafayette.

1932, September 12

Miriam Benedict Chapter

A boulder near the New York Central Station marking the site of the first cabin in LaPorte.

1932, September 17

Mary Penrose Wayne Chapter

At Sherman, south of the bridge, in Fort Wayne marking the site of the first French fort built in 1686.

1933, April 

Winchester Chapter

A Washington Elm was dedicated in Memorial Park by Mrs. Sarah Clevenger commemorating the George Washington Bicentennial.

1933, July 2

Abijah Bigelow Chapter

On the superior courthouse grounds at the corner of Michigan and Washington Streets in Michigan City to mark the Michigan Road from the Ohio River to Lake Michigan (1833-1933).

1933

Colonel Archibald Lochry Chapter

In Newton Park on United States Route 50 (now Eads Parkway) in Lawrenceburg honoring James B. Eads, engineer, who built the jetty at New Orleans, the Mississippi River Bridge at St. Louis, and was commissioned by President Lincoln to build iron clad gun boats for the Union.

1933, June 17

Nancy Knight Chapter

A bronze tablet on a boulder on the courthouse lawn in Hartford City honoring four Revolutionary War soldiers buried in Blackford County.

1933

Cornelia Cole Fairbanks Chapter

A marker on the grounds of James Whitcomb Riley Hospital in Indianapolis indicating the site of the homestead of Isaac Wilson, the first Revolutionary War soldier who died in Marion County.

1933, July 4

Lost River Chapter

A bronze tablet was unveiled, and a large native boulder dedicated in the park of the French Lick Springs Hotel commemorating the site of the French Lick Fort, built about 1815, which stood on the present hotel site.

1933, July

Dorothy Q Chapter

A marker placed in Memorial Park in Crawfordsville in memory of departed soldiers of all wars.

1933

Mishawaka Chapter

Marked the grave of Indian Princess Mishawaka.

1934

Lost River Chapter

A road sign was placed on State Road 37 six miles south of Paoli.  Inscribed: "Pivot Point, 200 yards west intersection of base line and second principal meridian.  The line fixed 1805 by E. Buckingham to govern land survey in Indiana under system of Continental Congress, 1785."

1934, February

Vanderburgh Chapter

Three pin oaks planted at Evansville College honoring the first three chapter regents, to be known as "Regent's Row".

1934, May 30

Lafayette Spring Chapter

A marker on the Cannelton Courthouse yard dedicated to General de Lafayette and the Revolutionary War soldiers buried in Perry County.

1934

Mary Mott Green Chapter

A marker at the grave of Susan Wetzel Goodrich who helped blaze the old Wetzel Trail through Shelby County.

1934, October

Frances Dingman Chapter

A boulder and marker at the corner of South Main and East Diamond Streets marking the "Old Indian Trail."

1935, July 25

Ouibache Chapter

A bronze marker at Indian Rock in Ravine Park in Attica to mark the spot where Indian tribes gathered.  The inscription reads, "Here by Indian Rock the Kickapoo, Miami, Shawnee, Potawatomi, Wea, Delaware and Wyandotte smoked their Tribal Pipe of Peace."

1935, September 8

Wa-pe-ke-way Chapter

A bronze marker four miles southwest of Brownsburg in White Lick Cemetery marking the grave of Real Daugher Nancy Mitchell Wilson. 

1935, October

Lafayette Spring Chapter

A bronze tablet on native stone in Tell City marking the southwest corner of the Vincennes Tract which was surveyed by Thomas Freeman and called Freeman's Corner.

1935

Vanderburgh Chapter

Three pin oaks added to "Regent's Row" at Evansville College honoring past chapter regents.

1935

New Harmony Chapter

Assisting in New Harmony, marking the Rapp Community House Number Two.

1935

Lost River Chapter

A marker located on ground owned by the town of Orleans just north of town on State Road 37 marking the northwest corner of the Vincennes Tract surveyed by Thomas Freeman in 1802-1803.  The corner, "Freeman's Corner" is located 839 feet north and 38 feet east of the marker.  Freeman's surveys helped landowners to secure clear title to the property.

1936, April

Miriam Benedict Chapter

A tree planted in the courthouse yard in LaPorte in honor of the Washington Bicentennial.

1936, May 15

Washburn Chapter

A marker west of the junction of the National Road and the Ten O'Clock Line to commemorate the treaty with the Indians that enabled the marking of townships and counties.

1936, August

Margaret Bryant Blackstone Chapter

At the junction of Route 152 and the Kankakee River to commemorate LaSalle's voyage down the Kankakee River.

1936, August

Margaret Bryant Blackstone Chapter

Located at the north end of Baums Bithel Road in Kouts, Porter County, at the site of Tassinong, the oldest village in northern Indiana.  It was a French mission and trading post in 1673.  A post office was established in 1837 with John Jones, postmaster.  It was incorporated as a village in 1852 by Joseph Bartholomew and Jesse Spencer.

1936, August

Margaret Bryant Blackstone Chapter

At the junction of Routes 152 and 8 to commemorate the founding of Hebron.

1936, August

Margaret Bryant Blackstone Chapter

A marker one and one-half miles south of Hebron along State Road 152 indicating the birth site of Margaret Bryant Blackstone.

1936, August 14

Pokagon Chapter

At the Steuben County Courthouse honoring the 1836-1936 pioneers of Steuben County.

1936, August 21

William Henry Harrison Chapter with Elizabeth Bassett Harrison C.A.R.

A marker on the lawn of the courthouse in Valparaiso placed during the Porter County Centennial, in memory of Porter County soldiers and sailers of all American wars.

1936, November 7

Washburn Chapter

A monument in Washington Township, Putnam County, commemorating the first white man, James H. Athey, to build in the community.  The first court was held in his home.

1936

Dubois County Chapter

A marker dedicated to the honor of Revolutionary War soldiers buried in Dubois County.

1936

The Hoosier Elm Chapter

A sandstone shelterhouse was erected about the trunk of Constitution Elm on West High Street in Corydon.  Embedded in the stone front of this shelter is a bronze tablet marking the site where the Constitution of Indiaan was framed in June 1816.  The elm lived until 1925.  It attained a height of fifty feet, a trunk diameter of five feet and a branch spread of one hundred thirty-two feet.  This shrine was under the care of The Hoosier Elm Chapter but has been donated to the State of Indiana.

1936

National Old Trails Chapter

A bronze marker placed at the west edge of Cambridge City on United States Route 40 to mark the Twelve Mile Purchase boundary line.

Prior to 1937

Lost River Chapter

A marker on Road 150 east of Paoli near the farm of Noble Bosley, inscribed, "First stage route, Old Louisville, Vincennes trace route of the first stagecoach line in the state established in 1820."

Prior to 1937

Lost River Chapter

Marker three-eighths of a mile south of the first stagecoach line at Half Moon Spring and the site of Half Moon Fort which was built by early settlers as protection against Indian raids.

Prior to 1937

Lost River Chapter

A marker along State Road 56 near the farm of Clyde Kearby, inscribed, "Moore's Fort site 300 feet north, one of several Orange County forts established during the early part of the 19th century for the protection of pioneer settlers from Indians."

Prior to 1937

Lost River Chapter

A marker was placed near West Baden at the junction of Orangeville Road and Road 150 with the inscription, "Rise of Lost River 4 1/2 miles north at Orangeville, after following underground from its disappearance 7 miles east, Lost River springs out of a huge rock."

Prior to 1937

Lost River Chapter

A roadside marker along Road 150 near the Lick Creek Church east of Paoli with the inscription, "First church site five hundred yards south near cemetery, first church of Orange County erected in 1813 by Lick Creek Meeting of Society of Friends; also site of early Lick Creek Friends Academy."

1937, May 30

Frances Dingman Chapter

A marker placed on the left gatepost of the old cemetery in Kendallville honoring the pioneers buried in the cemetery.

1937, September 17

Twin Forks Chapter

A bronze marker was placed to mark the location of the old land office in Brookville.

1937, November 19

James Hill Chapter

Dedication of the Herr Log Cabin, given by charter member Abigail Herr, located in Memorial Park.  The cabin was built in the early 1800s for the Herr family.  It belonged to the chapter until 1937 when the structure was turned over to the city of Lebanon.

1938, May 18

Frances Dingman Chapter

A boulder marker along Angling Road northwest of Kendallville on the site of an Indian village burning ground and trading post.

1938, May 23

General Van Rensselaer Chapter

A bronze tablet at the Washington Street Bridge in Rensselaer to mark the historic site of the first cabin.

1938, September 16

Schulyer Colfax Chapter

A tablet on the left of the main entrance of the school administration building at 228 South St. Joseph Street, South Bend, to mark the site of the first schoolhouse in 1831.

1938

Rushville Chapter

A bronze marker placed on the grave of Dr. Marshall Sexton, the first white child born in Rush County, 1823.

1939, April 13

General Arthur St. Clair Chapter

A marker on the lawn of the Indianapolis Central Library at St. Clair and Meridian Streets to honor General Arthur St. Clair.

1939, January

Alexander Hamilton Chapter

A marker was placed on the new Indiana Cottage at Tamassee DAR School honoring chapter member Georgis Duckworth Schlosser, State Regent.

1939, November 16

Julia Watkins Brass Chapter

A bronze plaque was placed on the Timothy Ball Grade School building in Crown Point to commemorate the pioneer teacher, preacher and historian, Timothy Ball.  The name of the school was selected by the Julia Watkins Brass Chapter, who also presented an oil painting to the public library.

1939, November 16

Miriam Benedict Chapter

Marked the home of Mariam Benedict near Westville.

1939

Nineteenth Star Chapter

A boulder, which was pulled into place by an elephant near the Mississinewa River Bridge on the Frances Slocum Trail marks the site of the Osage Indian Village where an Indian Treaty was made.

1939

Twin Forks Chapter

A bronze plaque on the Franklin County Courthouse lists all the Revolutionary War soldiers buried in the county.

1940, May 26

Spier Spencer Chapter

On the courthouse square in Rockport to commemorate 12 Revolutionary War soldiers buried in Spencer County.

1940, June 2

National Old Trails Chapter

A bronze tablet placed on the Huddleston house along U.S. 40 marking the 1821 home built by John Huddleston and used as a shelter by pioneers traveling the Old National Road.

1940, June2

Ouibache Chapter

Dedicated murals which has been painted by chapter member Mrs. Louis Johnson and daughter Mrs. Howard Miller and placed in the Fountain County Courthouse in Covington.

1940, June 3

National Old Trails Chapter

A large bronze tablet, attached to a boulder taken from the basement of the Huddleston homestead, was placed one mile west of Cambridge City along United States Route 40 to commemorate the homestead, then 101 years old, which was a famous tavern during stage coach days.

1940, October

Lost River Chapter

A memorial marker, built with old stone burrs from pioneer Orange County grist mills, carries a plate on its face inscribed with the names of 26 Revolutionary War soldiers and two patriots who are buried in Orange County.

1941, May 4

General de Lafayette Chapter

A bronze marker placed on the north wall of the courthouse in Lafayette commemorating the Wabash-Erie Canal which operated 1841-1872 between Toledo, Ohio and Evansville, Indiana, running through Lafayette.

1941

Caroline Scott Harrison Chapter

Assisted in planting a Washington elm at former U.S. President Benjamin Harrison's home in Indianapolis.

1942

Mary Penrose Wayne Chapter

A plaque placed on the cathedral grounds on South Calhoun Street in Fort Wayne to mark the buriel place of Jean Baptiste de Richardsville, who was the grandson of the first white merchant of Fort Wayne and the son of Tahcum-wahm who was the sister of Chief Little Turtle.  The plaque also commemorates Jean Baptiste de Richardsville's bravery in saving a white prisoner from being burnt at the stake by drunken Indians.

1946

Caroline Scott Harrison Chapter

A bronze marker placed and a red oak tree planted on the grounds at President Harrison's home in Indianapolis to honor members of families of the chapter who served in World War II.

1947, June 15

Fort Harrison Chapter

Replacement of grave markers placed by the historical society in Woodlawn Cemetery, Terre Haute.

Date Unknown

Nancy Knight Chapter

Two bronze plaques set in stone on the courthouse lawn in Hartford City in memory of those who served in World War I and World War II.

1948, June 14

Manitou Chapter

A flagpole and marker placed at Woodlawn Hospital at 7th and Pontiac Streets in Rochester.

1949

John Wallace Chapter

Marker at the Lawrence County Courthouse in Bedford to honor 28 Revolutionary War soldiers of Lawrence County.

1950

Major Hugh Dinwiddie Chapter

A plaque placed at the public library in Knightstown to commemorate 23 gold star soldiers of World War II from Wayne County.

1951, June 28

Cradle of Liberty Chapter

Pride's Fort Marker at the entracnce to Hornady Park in Petersburg, a short distance southwest of the original fort location in a field north of the highway, commemorates the pioneer spirit of early Pike County settlers who built the fort at White Oak Springs near this site.

1953, November 1

Julia Watkins Brass Chapter

A bronze plate, originally placed here on September 28, 1927 and destroyed in an auto accident in 1952, was remounted on a native red granite boulder and rededicated to the pioneer woman and Real Daughter Julia Watkins Brass.

1955, May 23

General James Cox Chapter

A cast aluminum marker painted colonial blue with raised silver letters and inscribed, "Pioneer Cemetery" was placed at the corner of Purdum and Superior Streets in Kokomo as a part of the DAR restoration project in 1955 to mark the site of Kokomo's first cemetery where many pioneers and Civil War soldiers are buried.  A chain link fence was placed around the cemetery.

1955, August 3

Twin Forks Chapter

Along United States Route 52 at Boundary Hill in Franklin County to mark the Greenville Treaty Line which opened southeastern Indiana to white settlement.

1955-1956

Desardee Chapter

A marker in Crown Hill Cemetery in Indianapolis in honor of the first white woman resident of Knox, Rachel Tilman Lambert, in whose home the county was organized and the first court held.

1958, September 10

William Tuffs Chapter

A bronze marker put on the southeast corner of a brick building occupied by the Martin Feed Store at 116 West Jackson Street in Elkhart to commemorate the first building erected in Elkhart for a United States Post Office.

1958, November 24

Lafayette Spring Chapter

A bronze plaque placed three miles east of Cannelton commemorating General Lafayette's shipwreck and inscribed, "Lafayette Spring."  Lafayette and his party spent the night in this community after the steamer Mechanic sank in the Ohio River May 9, 1825.  Pioneers came from miles around to visit him at his spring before he departed the following day on a passing steamer.  From this historic spot, Lafayette Spring Chapter DAR takes its name.

1960, February 18

Lafayette Spring Chapter

A bronze plaque three miles east of Cannelton commemorating the Abraham Lincoln Sesquicentennial and inscribed, "Dedicated to Abraham Lincoln and the Lincoln ideals and to all Perry County of his boyhood years, 1816-1830.  Lincoln - Humble, Homely, Lonely, Gifted, Great.  By Lafayette Spring Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution."

1960, October 27

Indiana DAR Marker

A cast aluminum marker was placed to commemorate the site of Fort William Henry Harrison at the northwest corner of U.S. 41 and Fort Harrison Road in Terre Haute.

1961, May 26

James Hill Chapter

East of Thorntown at the site of an historic Indian burial ground to commemorate the Eel River Indians.  The graves of Capadocia and Dixon, two chivalrous chieftains who perished in moral combat are in this burial ground.

1962, July 1

Washburn Chapter

New bronze plaques placed on the Bog Cabins in Greencastle City Park in Greencastle marking two cabins built as pioneer homes during 1840 in Putnam County.

1963, June 12

Twin Forks Chapter

At the Old Brookville Church and Cemetery in Brookville to mark the permanent church in Brookville.  It was built by Methodists in 1820, occupied by Methodists 1821-1839, by Presbyterians from 1839-1855, by Lutherans from 1855-1922 and by Baptists since 1953.  Buried in the cemetery in addition to many early settlers are four Revolutionary Way soldiers and a signer of Indiana's first consititution.

1963, September 29

Caroline Scott Harrison Chapter

A plaque located by the Benjamin Harrison monument in Crown Hill Cemetery in Indianapolis honoring Caroline Scott Harrison, the first President General, NSDAR.

1963, October 19

Dorothy Q Chapter

A plaque at the study grounds of General Lew Wallace in Crawfordsville inscribed, "To the Honor of David Wallace 1799-1859, Governor of Indiana 1837-1840.  Father of General Lew Wallace."

1964

Potawatomi Chapter

A plaque along United States Route 20 near Chesterton and Rensselaer near the historic residence of Joseph Baily, first white man and fur trader to settle in northern Indiana.

1965, May 15

Schuyler Colfax Chapter

A marker placed at Hamilton Church in New Carlisle marking one of the oldest churches north of the Wabash River.  Buried in the cemetery are two Revolutionary War soldiers, soldiers of the War of 1812, and soldiers of other major conflicts in American history.

1966, June 8

Twin Forks Chapter

A marker in Maple Grove Cemetery one quarter mile west of the west fork of Whitewater River inscribed, "This land was homesteaded by David Stoops, pioneer, 1811."

1966, June 14

Pokagon Chapter

A marker along State Road 120 at Fremont to commemorate the Vistula Territory Road.

1966, August 20

Multiple chapters

Five markers were placed to designate the historic Red Banks Trace, which played an important part in the development of the Northwest Territory, running from the Ohio River at Evansville to the Wabash River at Vincennes.  The markers were placed as follows:  1. White School at Broadway and Red Banks Road in Evansville by the Mary Anthony McGary Chapter; 2. Mesker Park Amphitheater entrance in Evansville by the Vanderburgh Chapter; 3. At the entrance to the Gibson County Fair Grounds by the Genearl John Gibson Chapter; 4. Federal Road 41 and State Road 241 near Decker by Indiana DAR; and 5. Greenlawn Cemetery in Vincennes by the Francis Vigo Chapter.

1966, September 10

Desardee Chapter

A plaque at the north end of Main Street in Knox to mark the site of the first court and the organizing of Starke County in 1850.

1966, November 10

Major Hugh Dinwiddie Chapter

A sweet gum tree was planted on the northeast corner of the new school year to commemorate the new school of Knightstown.

1966

Washburn Chapter

A bronze marker on the courthouse honoring the Revolutionary War soldiers buriedin Putnam County.

1967, January 14

The Hoosier Elm Chapter

A marker placed at teh Posey House in Corydon.  The house, owned and maintained by the chapter, was built in 1817 by Colonel Thomas Posey (1792-1863) who served as treasurer of Harrison County, cashier of the Corydon Bank of Vincennes, and was a legislator representing Harrison County.

1967

Fowler Chapter

A marker placed at 5 Michigan Street in Oxford at the site of the home of Basil Justus where the first Benton County Court was held in 1840.

1968, October 20

Dorothy Q and Olde Towne Chapters

Washburn Monument in Round Hill Cemetery at Montgomery in Coal Creek Township was dedicated to George Washburn, a Revolutionary War Indian spy.

1968

Captain Jacob Warrick Chapter

A marker placed at Darlington to mark the first county seat of what is now Warrick County.

1969, May 27

John Wallace Chapter

A plaque along Highway 50 east of Bedford to mark the site of the James Gregory house where Lawrence County was organized June 4, 1818.

1969, August 1

Multiple chapters

Five markers were placed along Old Trail from Fort Wayne to Fort Dearborn to indicate the pioneer trails which tracedd the way the Indians, pioneers, and military forces found their way across northern Indiana.  As the first project of the Indiana DAR for the United States of America Bicentennial, the markers were placed as follows:  1. The parkway in front of St. Vincent's Villa, 2000 N. Well Street, Fort Wayne by the Mary Penrose Wayne Chapter; 2. At Federal Road 20 and State Road 2 by the Miriam Benedict and Schuyler Colfax Chapters; 3. North of the south junction of State Roads 2 and 421 by the Indiana DAR; 4. Along State Road 51 three blocks north of Central Avenue in East Gary by the Potawatomi Chapter; 5. Along U.S. 20, two miles west of Route 41 and one mile east of Dyer by the Timothy Ball Chapter. 

1969

Paul Revere Chapter

Removed an original bronze tablet to the new courthouse.  The plaque honored Revolutionary War soldiers buried in Delaware County.

1971

Twin Forks Chapter

A roadside marker along 8th Street in Brookville placed at The Hermitage, marking the early studios of the famous landscape artists of Indiana, J. Ottis Adams and T.C. Steele, and the home of an art colony in the early 1900s.

1971, September 26

Sprinklesburg Chapter

A marker placed in Newburgh to commemorate Newburgh, a town north of the Mason-Dixon Line to be captured by the Confederate forces during the Civil War on July 18, 1862, when General Adam R. Johnson with a guerilla band crossed the Ohio River and confiscated supplies and ammunition without a shot being fired.

1973

Julia Watkins Brass Chapter

A world time clock was placed in the Crown Point Library honoring Harriet Warner Holton, Lake County's first teacher in the spring of 1835.

1973, June 5

John Connor Chapter

A plaque on the lawn of the fire station at 6th and Grand Avenue in Connersville to mark the site of Roots Woolen Mill 1845-1875, inscribed, "Birthplace of the Blower."

1974, February 17

General Charles Scott Chapter

At the county courthouse in Scotsburg to honor 19 Revolutionary War soldiers buried in Scott County.

1975, February 1

John Paul Chapter

A plaque in the Springdale Cemetery in Madison to honor the Alois O. Backman Post, G.A.R., for their foresight in donating burial sites for our honored veterans of the U.S. Armed Forces of Jefferson County.

1975, May 19

Dr. Manasseh Cutler Chapter

A tulip tree planted in Warvel Park in North Manchester in honor of Honorary Vice President General Mrs. Furel R. Burns.

1975, June 8

Francis Vigo Chapter

A plaque in the Old Cathedral St. Francis Xavier Cemetery in Vincennes in memorial to George Rogers Clark and his men who fought in the swamps to take Fort Sackville from the British in 1779.

1975, August

Ross' Run Chapter

A marker at the juntion of Routes 48 and 229 in recognition of early Indiana circuit riders and honoring Reverend Joseph Williams, a Methodist minister.

1975, October 3

Ouibache Chapter

A plaque on the south wall of the Attica City Building to mark the site of the Tecumseh Council Oak where Tecumseh and the Prophet held council before the Battle of Tippecanoe.

1975, November

General Thomas Posey Chapter

A plaque on the entry wall of the Working Men Institute in Mount Vernon to commemorate the valor of the Revolutionary War soldiers buried in Posey County.

1975

Christopher Harrison Chapter

A plaque on the State Bank in Salem marking the home site of Christopher Harrison, inscribed, "Site of home and garden of Indiana's First Lieutenant Governor, pioneer merchant, attorney, judge, horticulturist, member Territorial Legislature and one of the Commissioners to lay out State Capital City."

1975

Mary Bryan Chapter

A plaque near Southport Cemetery in Greenwood honoring one of the first pioneer American women to come across the Cumberland Mountains around 1776.

1976, May 16

Pokagon Chapter

A plaque on the Steuben County jail and sheriff's residence in Angola marking two buildings on the National Register of Historic Landmarks.

1976, May

Ten O'Clock Line Chapter

A marker at Story denoting the Ten O'Clock Line.

1976, May 26

General Van Rensselaer Chapter

A plaque in the First Presbyterian Church yard in Rensselaer honoring James Van Rensselaer, Revolutionary War soldier and founder of the town.

1976, June 10

John Conner Chapter

A marker along Road 475E three and one-half miles west of Eerton designating the site of Bentley Grange Hall, post office and store where Milton Trusler conceived the idea of "rural free delivery."

1976, June 12

Dr. Manasseh Cutler Chapter

A boulder along North Main Street at the entrance to the former Holderman Cemetery, founded before 1840, in North Manchester and dedicated to patrons and soldiers of early wars.

1976, June 13

Lafayette Spring Chapter

A redwood sign, with a picture of General Marquis de Lafayette enclosed in plexiglass, placed three miles east of Cannelton indicating where he was shipwrecked in the Ohio and took shelter at Lafayette Spring on May 9, 1825.

1976, June 13

James Hill Chapter

A marker on the courthouse lawn in Lebanon with additional names of Revolutionary War soldiers buried in Boone County.

1976, June 13

Kentland Chapter

A plaque along North County Farm Road near Kentland to mark the site of "The Old Log Church," the first church in Newton County.

1976, June 15

John Paul Chapter

A plaque in the John Paul Park in Madison marking the pioneer burial ground deeded March 9, 1826 by John Paul.

1976, June 26

Mary Anthony McGary and Vanderburgh Chapters

A brass plaque on a granite stone at the U.S. Post Office Federal Building in Evansville honoring nine Revolutionary War soldiers buried in Vanderburgh County.

1976, July 4

Antoinne Rivarre Chapter

A marker on the Rivarre Indian Reservation honoring Revolutionary War soldiers.

1976, July 4

Antoinne Rivarre Chapter

A monument at the courthouse in Decatur honoring Revolutionary War soldiers of Adams County.

1976, July 5

Richmond Chapter

Rededication of the Madonna of the Trail monument at the entrance to Glenn Miller Park in Richmond.

1976, July 10

Obadiah Taylor Chapter

A plaque in the Creston Cemetery in Cedar Creek Township, Lake County, to mark the grave of Rosina Surprise, the only known Indian woman buried in Lake County.

1976, August 29

Colonel Archbald Lochry Chapter

A marker at the Fulton Burying Ground along State Road 56 north of Rising Sun with the inscription, "In 1798 Samuel Fulton and father Job, Revolutionary War Soldiers, his mother Jane Dils Fulton, brother Thomas, brother-in-law Christopher Huston and families made first permanent settlement on bank of Ohio River in present Rising Sun."

1976, September

Twin Forks Chapter

A tulip tree planted on the grounds of the public library in Brookville was dedicated to pioneer settlers of Franklin County.

1976, October 16

Sprinklesburg Chapter

A marker commemorating the landing of Major John Sprinkle on the Ohio River in the spring of 1803.  The town founded there was the first permanent settlement in Warrick County and named Sprinklesburg, later renamed Newburgh.

1976, November 26

Capital William Wells Chapter

A plaque on a store front in the 100 block of North Main Street in Bluffton marks the site of the first Wells County Courthouse.

1976

Fort Harrison Chapter

A marker at old Fort Harrison along Route 41 north of Terre Haute in memory of the patriots buried at Fort Harrison.

1976

Christopher Harrison Chapter

A plaque on the museum in Salem honoring Revolutionary War soldiers buried in Washington County.

1976

Spier Spencer Chapter

A plaque in Heritage Park in Rockport honoring Revoutionary War soldiers buried in Spencer County.

1977, May 28

General Thomas Posey Chapter

Marker on courthouse square in Mount Vernon in memory of 15 Revolutionary War soldiers buried in Posey County.

1977, May 30

Fort Harrison Chapter

A marker was in the parking lot at First and Sycamore Streets in Terre Haute to commemorate the valor of the pioneers who defended Fort Harrison.

1977, July 26

General Van Rensselaer Chapter

At the east end of the Washington Street Bridge in Rensselaer, the site of the first log cabin built during the American Revolution along the Iroquois River by Joseph D. Yeoman in 1836, was rededicated.

1977, September 18

Colonel Archibald Lochry Chapter

A marker in Zion M.E. Cemetery in Wrights Corner commemorating Reverand Daniel Plummer, a circuit rider with 50 years service in the ministry as a pioneer preacher.

1977, October 8

Old Ridge Road Chapter

A marker one quarter mile east of Girard Road along the Lincoln Highway (U.S. 30) inscribed, "The Ridge Road, also known as Sugar Ridge Road or Van Wert Road, was originally a natural pathway following the glacial ridge, once the southwestern beach of Lake Maumee.  It extended from Van Wert, Ohio to Fort Wayne, being used by Indians and early settlers."  It is now the Lincoln Highway.

1977, November 10

General John Gibson Chapter

A monument on the south side of the courthouse in Princeton honoring Revolutionary War soldiers buried in Gibson County.

1978

John Paul Chapter

Redeication of memorial in John Paul Park in Madison.

1978, May 29

Muscatatuck Chapter

A plaque at the county courthouse in North Vernon honoring Revolutionary War soldiers buried in Jennings County.

1979, September 19

Schuyler Colfax Chapter

A tablet on a boulder at 120 South St. Joseph Street in South Bend remarking the site of the first city school built in 1831.

1979

Paul Revere Chapter

Additional names of Revolutionary War soldiers buried in Delaware County added to the plaque at Delaware County Courthouse.

1980, May

Seeks Village Chapter

Marker along Old Trail Road in South Whitley indicating the site of Seek's Village Indian Reserve.  Destroyed by vandals prior to dedication.

1980, June 16

Dorothy Q Chapter

Additional names of Revolutionary War soldiers buried in Montgomery County added to the plaque located at Elston Place in Crawfordsville.

1981, March 28

Rushville Chapter

An additional plaque on either side of the original tablet at the courthouse in Rushville honoring 21 additional Revolutionary War soldiers buried in Rush County.

1981, May 30

Antoinne Rivarre Chapter

Flag staff erected over the original stone marker at the Rivarre Indian Reservation.

1981, October 1

Mary Anthony McGary and Vanderburgh Chapters

The marker at the U.S. Post Office and Federal Building in Evansville was rededicated to celebrate the Bicentennial of Yorktown.

1981

Ten O'Clock Line Chapter

Plaque in Brown County marking the Brown County Bluebird Nesting Trail.

1982, May 1

Paul Revere Chapter

Marker at 715 East Washington in Muncie indicating the site of the birthplace of Emily Kimbrough.

1982, June 10

John Conner Chapter

Marker at the corner of 5th and Eastern Avenue in Connersville, naming historic sites on that corner.

1982, August 22

Colonel Archibald Lochry Chapter

Marker in Riverview Cemetery in Aurora honoring additional Revolutionary War soldiers killed by Indans while in the service of Colonel Archibald Lochry.

1982, September 17

Schuyler Colfax Chapter

Marker at 112 Lafayette Boulevard in South Bend in memory of Revolutionary War soldiers buried in St. Joseph County.

1983, June 12

Mary Penrose Wayne Chapter

A new plaque, replacing the stolen one originally set in 1930 at the south end of the Sherman Street Bridge on the bank of the St. Mary's River in Fort Wayne marking the site of Post Miami, the first French fort in the area used from 1680-1750.

1983, July 24

Mississinewa Chapter

Replacement and rededication of marker accidentally destroyed.  See original May 1923 placement date for details.

1983

Paul Revere Chapter

The renovation of the September 6, 1926 marker.

1983, August 9

Colonel Archibald Lochry Chapter

Replaced and rededicated bronze marker commemorating first family to settle permanently in Dearborn County in 1796.

1983, September 8

Francis Vigo and Vanderburgh Chapters

Marked revived grave site of Henry Vanderburgh in Woodlawn Cemetery in Vincennes.  He was a Revolutionary War soldier, member of Society of Cincinnati, and judge of Indiana Territory.  Vanderburgh County was named in his honor as was Vanderburgh Chapter.

1985, November 12

Margaret Bryant Blackstone Chapter 

A bronze plaque located two miles south of Hebron on State Road 2 was placed marking the birthplace of Margaret Bryant, first white child born in Boone Township, Porter County, Indiana.

1986, May 28

Hindostan Falls Chapter

Plaque placed at Houghton House, State Road 550 near Shoals and Loogootee commemorating Evergreen Hill, the homestead of Aaron Houghton, ca. 1835.

1987, December

Winchester Chapter

Bronze plaque on a large boulder dedciated at the Randolph County Courthouse in memory of the Revolutionary War soldiers of Randolph County.

1988, October 2

Indiana DAR and Richmond Chapter

Rededication of the Madonna of the Trail at Glenn Miller Park in Richmond, Indiana.  A bronze tablet mounted in granite was dedicated commemorating the restoration of the Madonna of the Trail, state project of Mrs. Robert P. Rehl.

1988, December 18

Mary Penrose Wayne Chapter

A bronze plaque was placed on the east side of the entry hall to the Allen County-Ft. Wayne Historical Museum, Berry Street, Fort Wayne commemorating the gift of over 500 artifacts collected and donated by the chapter since its founding in 1901.

1989, October 7

Francois Godfrey Chapter

Marker placed at Montpelier commemorating the Treaty of St. Mary's (6 October 1818) which reserved six sections of land for Chief Francois Godfrey of the Miami Nation.

1990, May 6

Seek's Village Chapter

Historic marker dedicated, replacing the original one set in 1980 on the Old Trail Road at the site of Seek's Village Miami Indian Reserve.

1990, September 8

Lost River Chapter

Rededication of the bronze marker at French Lick Springs Resort which was the site of an early American fort erected by William Henry Harrison in the early 1800s for the protection of early settlers from the Indians.

1990, October 11

Vanderburgh Chapter

Marker placed in Wesselman Park in Evansville at the site of the McCallister Cemetery in honor of the pioneer McCallister family.  This marking was completed in honor of NSDAR commemorating "A Century of Service to the Nation, 1890-1990."

1990, December

Indiana DAR

Bronze plaque was placed in Crown Hill Cemetery, Indianapolis, Indiana, section 23, lot 24, in memory of Jaine Griffith Beck, State Regent, 1915-1918.

1990, December

Indiana DAR

Bronze plaque was placed in Greenwood Cemetery, also known as Pleasant Grove Cemetery, W100 N, Etna Road at State Road 9 in Huntington Township, Huntington, Indiana, in memory of Edna Belle Simons Felter, State Regent, 1918-1921.

1991, March 17

Indiana DAR, Fort Vallonia, Joseph Hart and Horseshoe Prairie Chapters

Three markers were placed along the Barholomew Trail from Vallonia through Tiptonia (now Columbus) to the Upper Delaware Town on White River near the trading post of William Conner.  The markers were placed as follows: 1. At Fort Vallonia; 2. Near Garland Brook Cemetery, Columbus; and 3. On the grounds of Conner Prairie.

1992, October 18

Joseph Hart Chapter

Bronze plaque placed at State Road 9 and 300 N near Sharon Cemetery at Hope in Bartholomew County commemorating Jonathan Moore, Revolutionary War soldier who served with General George Washington's lifeguards and is buried in Sharon Cemetery.

1993

Nineteenth Star Chapter

Moved and restored the Osage Rock which was placed in memory of the Osage Indian Village.

1994, April 9

Joseph Hart Chapter

Bronze marker placed at the site of the first licensed ferry on the Driftwood River, Bartholomew County, commemorating John Lindsey who, on March 19, 1821, was issued a license to operate the ferry.  The marker was restored by the chapter in 2016.

1995

Washburn Chapter

Held dedication ceremony for restoration of the 1840 log cabin in Robe Ann Park in Greencastle.

1995, May 7

Indiana DAR

Bronze marker placed at the Newsom home in Azalia, Bartholomew County, commemorating the purported overnight stop of Samuel Merrill, state treasurer, and John Douglass, state printer, and their families in October of 1824 when state records were moved from Corydon to Indianapolis.  This marking was a project of State Regent Mary M. Morgan.

1995, May 7

Joseph Hart Chapter

Bronze marker placed at the Sandcreek-Azalia Friends Meeting at Azalia commemorating the families of John Hall and John Thomas whose homes stood nearby and were stations on the underground railroad.  It was restored by the chapter in 2017.

1995, July 4

Indiana DAR

Bronze marker placed on State Road 60 in Pekin honoring Pekin, Indiana, a town reported to have held Fourth of July celebrations regularly since the 1830s.  This marking was a project of State Regent MarjiAnn Martin Souder (Mrs. Dawson C.).

1996

Winchester Chapter

Restoration and preservation of World War I Doughboy statue erected by Winchester Chapter on November 11, 1928.

1996, August 11

Alexander Hamilton, Joseph Hart and Ten O'Clock Line Chapters

Marker placed at Camp Atterbury honoring civilian contributions during World War I, World War II, and the Korean Conflict.

2001, April 7

Indiana DAR

Bronze marker placed near Grouseland, home of William Henry Harrison in Vincennes, honoring the 200th Anniversary of the Indiana Territory.  Formed from the Northwest Territory on July 4, 1800, Vincennes was the territorial capital and William Henry Harrison the first territorial governor.  This marking was a project of State Regent Janice Powell Bolinger (Mrs. Donal L.) and was funded by the sale of commemorative plates.

2002

Indiana DAR

Bronze marker at site of Ft. Harrison in Terre Haute which had been placed during the administration of State Regent Mrs. John G. Biel was restored and reset.  The restoration was funded from the plate sales which was a project of State Regent Janice Powell Bolinger (Mrs. Donal L.).

2004, September

Indiana DAR

Bronze marker at site of the Madonna of the Trail in Richmond, placed during the administration of State Regent Jane Haymaker Rehl (Mrs. Robert P.) was repaired and reset.  A new bronze marker was placed commemorating the restoration of the Madonna of the Trail, a project of State Regent JoAn Lowes Nichols (Mrs. Lowell).  The two markers were placed side by side on a new base.

2005

William Tuffs Chapter

Rededication of the bronze tablet that was placed July 4, 1932 honoring three Revolutionary War soldiers buried in Elkhart County.  Two additional names of soldiers were added to the tablet.

2006

Manitou Chapter

Erected five metal historical highway signs across Fulton County north to south along the Michigan Road to mark the Potawatomi Trail of Death.

2006, July 15

General John Gibson Chapter

Rededication of marker that was placed in 1914.  Marker was moved from original site to opposite corner of courthouse grounds.  The marker commemorated Judge William Prince, who was a judge of the district, then part of the Northwest Terrirtory.

2007, April 7

Indiana DAR

INDAR marker, Janice Bolinger (Mrs. Donal), State Regent, cast aluminum marker "Indiana Territory," Vincennes State Historic Site, One West Harrison Street, Vincennes.

2007, May

Indiana DAR

Bronze marker placed commemorating Acton Campground that was established before the Civil War to provide for Christian and proper social events.  This marking was a project of State Regent JoAn Lowes Nichols (Mrs. Lowell).

2008, May 22

Captain Henry Vanderburgh Chapter

Dedicated and placed a commemorative marker in honor of Willard Carpenter, philanthropist, community leader, and founder of Willard Library in 1885.  Marker placed at the Willard Library in Evansville.

2008, December 29

Alexander Hamilton Chapter

Revolutionary Soldiers and Patriots of Johnson County.

2009, June 20

Indiana DAR

Cast aluminum marker dedciated at Seiberling Mansion, 1200 W. Sycamore Street, Kokomo, Howard County.  Home built in 1890 for Monroe Seiberling, a well known Kokomo natural gas boom industrialist.  The New Jacobean, Romanesque mansion took three years to build, costing $50,000.  George Kingston, investor of the carburetor used in Henry Ford's Model-T, lived in the mansion from 1914 to 1946.  Project of State Regent Cynthia Thompson Stout (Mrs. Allen).

2009, August 22

Caroline Scott Harrison Chapter

Placed a monument and marker at the grave of Real Daughter Patsy Patterson, Crown Hill Cemetery, Indianapolis.

2009

Colonel Augustin de la Balme Chapter

Dedicated grave marker for Zilpha Burdge Hurd, daughter of Revolutionary War soldier, Michael Burdge at the Eel River Presbyterian Cemetery, Union Township, Whitley County.

2009, September 19

Cornelia Cole Fairbanks Chapter

Dedicated bronze marker commemorating Cornelia Cole Fairbanks, President General, NSDAR, 1901-1905, at the home of Mrs. Fairbanks in Indianapolis.

2010, April 25

Joseph Hart Chapter

Marked grave of Real Daugher Mary Forbes Gano Bryan Cobb near Kokomo, Howard County.

2010, September

Colonel Augustin de la Balme Chapter

Removed the original DAR stone marker placed in 1930 to commemorate the Revolutionary War battle site on de la Balme Road in Whiley County and replaced the crumbling base, resetting the stone.  Rededicated November 2010.

2011, August 19

Indiana DAR

Rededicated the La Petit Fort Revolutionary War Historical marker at the site of small Revolutionary War battle on December 5, 1780.  The site is now within Indiana Dunes State Park and originally placed in May 1957.  The marker was restored by Roger and Martha Barnhart and moved to a more prominent location due to park expansion.

2011, August 20

Indiana DAR

Dedication of the new historical marker placed at the restored Stewart-Griesinger Cemetery entrance in Washington Township, Noble County.  Buried here is the grave of Revolutionary War soldier Pvt Joseph Galloway PA, one of only two Revolutionary War soldiers buried in Noble County.  The cemetery restoration was a project  of Martha Barnhart and husband Roger.  The marker was the project of State Regent Martha Barnhart.

2012, May 10

Eagle Creek Chapter

Flagpole at Speedway Junior High School.  Dedicated to those patriotic students of Speedway, past, present, and future who serve their community and country.

2013, July 20

John Paul Chapter

Rededication of the bronze marker, "The Beginning of Michigan Road," at the intersection of West and Milton Streets, Madison, Jefferson County.

2013, August 3

Joseph Hart Chapter

Placed a marker honoring Ceraline Mfg. Co. and Joseph Gent for his patents and mass production operations with Gaff and Thomas to make Ceraline Corn Flakes in Columbus in 1880, the beginnings of cold breakfast cereal and a corn malt alternative for brewers.

2013, October 12

Caroline Scott Harrison Chapter

Placed a DAR marker at the grave of Caroline Scott Harrison, first NSDAR President General, at Crown Hill Cemetery in Indianapolis.

2014, September 14

Caroline Scott Harrison Chapter

Placed a marker at Bell Cemetery in cooperation with the Indiana Historical Bureau and Daniel T. Moriarity, Trustee, Perry Township, Indianapolis.

2014, November 11

Joseph Hart Chapter

Dedication of marker commemorating Mary Means Hart, wife of Joseph Hart, Revolutionary War Patriot, Garland Brook Cemetery, Columbus, Bartholomew County.

2015, April 18

Richmond-Indiana and National Old Trails Chapters

Commissioned a granite bench in honor of Revolutionary War soldiers and patriots buried in Wayne County.  The bench was dedicated and placed in Veteran's Memorial Park in Richmond.

2015, May 21

Joseph Hart Chapter

Dedication of marker commemorating Mary Means Hart, wife of Joseph Hart, Revolutionary War Patriot, Garland Brook Cemetery, Bartholomew County.

2015, June 20

Captain Jacob Warrick Chapter

Placed a marker commemorating Jesse Boon.  The city of Boonville was named in his honor.  He was the son of a Revolutionary War Patriot and the father of Ratliff Boon, the second Governor of Indiana.

2016, May

Cornelia Cole Fairbanks Chapter

Regained ownership of the National Old Road Obelisk and restored it along with planting native landscaping as part of the Indiana Bicentennial.  Also deddciated bricks at the Soldiers and Sailors Monument, Indianapolis.

2016, September 10

Mississinewa Chapter

Placed a marker on a boulder at the entrance of the Old Portland Burying Ground in Jay County in honor of Indiana's Bicentennial.

2016, September 18

Schuyler Colfax Chapter

Remarked the site of the first school built in South Bend.

2018, October 16

Galloway-Prentice Chapter